Open Minds

Open MindsA few days after a delightful evening dinner, she strolled into my office and announced, “No one can close me on the first attempt.”

I smiled, because nine months earlier, as I was settling into my new office location, it was she who had bounced in with an idea for me, and my money.

Appreciative of the exuberance of youth and enamored with the idea of being a good neighbor, I said, “Yes.”

Agreement was reached on a time for her to make the short trip across the hall from her Life Insurance Company to my CPA Company. As a Shooting Star of her prominent business organization, she was given the opportunity to enter my boutique world of the Hired Gun.

For thirty years, I have focused on the bulls-eye of the targets set by those business people, and my friends, who are intent upon achieving success. Interested by what I might learn from this Quick-draw Artist, my time was offered to her. The, only, caveat (quid pro quo, if you will) was that she and her husband join me for dinner, some evening in the future.

With the benefit of education and experience in running the numbers, I was genuinely curious about what I might have overlooked in regards to the odds of betting against ourselves. Life insurance is, really, Death insurance. As a financial tool, it has its place in the box.

Having built a little empire in my youth and given it away in middle-age, the idea of buying protection against the capricious hand of fate was laughable. Yet, I was intrigued by the enthusiasm of this young woman on a mission.

Consistent with the beginning, at the end of our two hours together, I politely declined her sale of Life Insurance. For the months that followed, I graciously reminded her of my offer. Then, right in the middle of Tax Season, I must have been looking a little frazzled. My young, Insurance Agent, neighbor bounced in again to ask if I might consider Long-term Care Insurance. Again, I laughed and said, “No.”

Imagine my surprise when, after months of avoiding my offer for dinner, she bounces in, once again, with Calendar in hand to schedule a date! She had just come from a successful excursion of selling to one of my biggest fans. Some combination of the adrenalin rush of a Contract Closing and Colorful Conversation, emanating from a discovery of this mutual Client Connection, was the catalyst for her new-found want and need to accept my offer.

So, we went to dinner. The three of us: Insurance Agent, Successful Entrepreneur (her husband), and Certified Public Accountant. A pleasant evening it was.

A few days after that time together is when I heard, “No one can close me on the first attempt.”

With the smile, mentioned at the beginning of this story, I responded, “Yes, anything of importance needs time to be decided.”

Later in the week, during an early morning shower, it dawned on me: My passion for “Building Bright Financial Futures” and “Building Dynamic Relationships” can be perceived as Salesmanship. To be blunt: It ain’t!

My purpose is not to Close. It is to Open!

In fact, I believe and practice a recently self-minted mantra of the Three-E Formula, which is to: Enlighten, Empower, and Encourage.

My goal is to broaden horizons, share stories, and provide feedback, for the express purpose of guiding others on the paths of their choice. Because each of our world views is different, I am very respectful of the unique choices that we, as individuals, make.

I have, absolutely, no desire to “close” anyone, or anything. At this point in my life’s journey, I refer and give away more projects than I accept. In fact, the Projects are of secondary importance. My passion is, all, about the People!

Many have heard me say, many times, “Never let anyone talk you into, or out of, anything. Hold firmly to your beliefs, until you choose to change them.”

That, my dear friends, is another of those fine lines. We fiercely maintain the boundaries of who we are and what we believe, while being open to new ideas. We walk the high-wire between these two realities: we perceive, only, what we believe and infinite learning waits for us.

This tightrope walk is made between the separate philosophies of Selling and Offering. One is competitively pushing customers to a closing; the other is compassionately guiding friends to an opening. One thinks business is about selling; the other believes life is about choices and providing others the opportunity to acquire what is right for themselves.

There is only one thing worthy of being “closed” and that is the Past. I’m passionate about the Present; right here, right now, it’s great to be alive. I believe the brightest Future is possible when we focus on using our financial resources to build dynamic relationships!

www.kimfoard.com

Education and Experience

Dream RulesBorn with an innate sense of curiosity, I have always wanted to know: “Why?”

It didn’t take long to discover that parents, teachers and friends were wearied by an endless barrage of questions. In fact, discovery was made that they didn’t have the answers to many of my questions!

Then, in about the sixth grade, a treasure trove of information was found: A Library. Books galore, each with a story to tell, chock full of knowledge, wisdom and understanding. An education was just waiting for me.

As time marched forward, I learned much from the stories of others. It was one of those “Good News; Bad News” storylines. The Good News: I didn’t have to reinvent the wheel for each excursion into a new frontier. The Bad News: The view only changes for the lead dog.

Moral of all Stories: We can learn from others all that they know, and no more.

Unless we want to follow others, forever, there is a point of departure from the known, into the unknown. In fact, we can never duplicate the experience of another by listening to the stories of how they did something.

We are unique; our experiences will be, too.

Once our formal education ends, the real learning begins. The process is aptly referred to as the “School of Hard Knocks”. There are plenty of assignments, pop quizzes, final exams, and lessons to be learned. We choose the curriculum and face the consequences of our choices.

As our eyes are opened to Universal Principles, we quickly learn that there is a “right way”: a way that is right for us, individually. That way is different for each of us and can only be learned by courageously taking the steps along our, individual, journey of life.

No one else can do it for us. All of the stories from other people are of limited value. This is our life; we are Trailblazers. There are no maps for territories yet to be discovered.

Upon our return from the wilderness, we have stories to tell, an education to share.

The cycle repeats. Young people receive a glimpse into the world that waits. Soon, they leave the stories behind to do it, Their Way, and then learn: Good judgment comes from experience; Experience comes from bad judgment.

Over the course of our individual journeys, we learn that it takes both: Education and Experience.

Rules Kids Won’t Learn In School

Rule No. 1: Life is not fair. Get used to it. The average teen-ager uses the phrase “It’s not fair” 8.6 times a day. You got it from your parents, who said it so often you decided they must be the most idealistic generation ever. When they started hearing it from their own kids, they realized Rule No. 1.

Rule No. 2: The real world won’t care as much about your self-esteem as much as your school does. It’ll expect you to accomplish something before you feel good about yourself. This may come as a shock. Usually, when inflated self-esteem meets reality, kids complain that it’s not fair. (See Rule No. 1)

Rule No. 3: Sorry, you won’t make $60,000 a year right out of high school. And you won’t be a vice president or have a car phone either. You may even have to wear a uniform that doesn’t have a Gap label.

Rule No. 4: If you think your teacher is tough, wait ’til you get a boss. He doesn’t have tenure, so he tends to be a bit edgier. When you screw up, he’s not going to ask you how you feel about it.

Rule No. 5: Flipping burgers is not beneath your dignity. Your grandparents had a different word for burger flipping. They called it opportunity. They weren’t embarrassed making minimum wage either. They would have been embarrassed to sit around talking about Kurt Cobain all weekend.

Rule No. 6: It’s not your parents’ fault. If you screw up, you are responsible. This is the flip side of “It’s my life,” and “You’re not the boss of me,” and other eloquent proclamations of your generation. When you turn 18, it’s on your dime. Don’t whine about it, or you’ll sound like a baby boomer.

Rule No. 7: Before you were born your parents weren’t as boring as they are now. They got that way paying your bills, cleaning up your room and listening to you tell them how idealistic you are. And by the way, before you save the rain forest from the blood-sucking parasites of your parents’ generation, try delousing the closet in your bedroom.

Rule No. 8: Your school may have done away with winners and losers. Life hasn’t. In some schools, they’ll give you as many times as you want to get the right answer. Failing grades have been abolished and class valedictorians scrapped, lest anyone’s feelings be hurt. Effort is as important as results. This, of course, bears not the slightest resemblance to anything in real life. (See Rule No. 1, Rule No. 2 and Rule No. 4.)

Rule No. 9: Life is not divided into semesters, and you don’t get summers off. Not even Easter break. They expect you to show up every day. For eight hours. And you don’t get a new life every 10 weeks. It just goes on and on. While we’re at it, very few jobs are interested in fostering your self-expression or helping you find yourself. Fewer still lead to self-realization. (See Rule No. 1 and Rule No. 2.)

Rule No. 10: Television is not real life. Your life is not a sitcom. Your problems will not all be solved in 30 minutes, minus time for commercials. In real life, people actually have to leave the coffee shop to go to jobs. Your friends will not be as perky or pliable as Jennifer Aniston.

Rule No. 11: Be nice to nerds. You may end up working for them. We all could.

www.kimfoard.com

Cutting-edge Generosity

Gift of TimeFifty years ago, on the Main Street of a little town in Lavina, Montana, an older gentleman gave a knife to a young child. Naturally, he wanted to teach a lesson; so, he presented it to me, handle, first. It was the most magnificent rubber knife that I ever enjoyed.

This was back in the day when everyone gave directions by using the Phone Booth, next to the little Post Office, as a reference point. Men of that generation were always building something; seems like Dad and I were in town to help pour a sidewalk in front of that new Post Office. It was my lucky day to be the beneficiary of Mr. J. C. “Jim” Jensen.

His generosity is the beginning of this story about the Jensen family.

Jimmy was always the most interested in my life story when the chapters were about bowling and building. As an inventor, he was interested in my construction techniques. He would take the good ones of mine and offer the best of his ideas to make it even better. Tangible to those he helped were the Sand-Points driven to provide water.  isible to the community was the lighted Ice-Windmill for the entertainment pleasure of all.

Carl was comprised of the material of which heroes are made: Handsome devil on the outside; borderline saint on the inside. The one thing that always interrupted my play with the rubber knife was when Carl and his college buddies came to help my Dad on the ranch. After lunch, they would play ball with me. Literally; I was the ball! Tossed from one to the other: sometimes, it was a full-body catch; other times, only the last-second grab of an arm, or leg, kept me from hurtling to the earth, below.

Through high school, Carl supported every cause that our senior class dreamed up. My first sale of Cutco knives, as a freshman in college, was made in his kitchen. After working the last two years of my college crusade for a CPA firm, I was asked if I wanted to “help” with the Ranch books. That was in the olden-days, when accounting was done in paper Journals and Ledgers.

With hind-sight, I now realize the “help” requested was for my benefit, not Carl’s. He was quite capable of doing the Books and had done so, successfully, for many years. His keen eye observed a young accountant, who needed to build confidence. I was offered that opportunity.

Then, he blazed new trails in the use of Excel spreadsheets on the first Personal Computers. As I might be struggling to make something work in the Land of DOS, I would think of that hero of mine leading the way. Weakness gave way to strength, as a path through the technological wilderness was found.

Speaking of strength, what does it take to stand firm in the belief that life is all about the people? If there is an episode in the annuals of Lavina history to provide the answer, it is the one of a new Library and Gymnasium. Having served on the School Board for many years, Carl understood the importance of education and community. In small towns, the School is the anchor keeping ships of families safe.

In the mind of J. C. (Carl) Jensen, the cost of a little Brick and Mortar was a small price to pay for the eternal dividends from that one investment. He gave what he had, personally and financially, to bring a dream into reality.

Supportive of these men of the Jensen family are women of toughness and tenderness. Theirs is a story of nurturing everyone through the hardships of Ranch life. From the outside looking in, the full measure of their generosity is unknown to many. From within the familial core, these Jensen women offer goodness to all and they continue to make sacrifices that will engender the greatest rewards.

As this chapter of the story about the gifts of the Jensen Family concludes, the question remains: “Why was I handed a knife?” Just, maybe, “Jim” Jensen knew that cutting-edge generosity was the secret to slicing through the thickets of resistance on our individual journeys of Building Bright Financial Futures.

Craig, Scott and Clint continue to live the Family traditions. They begin each conversation by honoring the gifts of the Past, respecting the opportunities of the Present, and dreaming big, big, thoughts as they consider the abundance of, very, bright Futures!

www.kimfoard.com

Distinguished

Distinguished

Last week, a woman said to me, “I’m open to anything.”

The week before, a woman commented, “I’m all caved up.”

As a man and subject to the impulses of the visual creatures that we are, naturally, the image of Open messed with my mind more so than Closed. As a gentleman and wanting to maintain the PG-rating of this forum, that runaway thought was quickly corralled into the larger issue: Sieves and Stones.

Questions: How far will someone go who is open to anything? How captive is someone who is all caved up?

Answer: Only, they know.

The common thread between the two is that neither has taken the time and energy to discover who they, really, are, or what they want for their lives. It’s so much easier to let someone else make the decisions for them and then be disappointed when things don’t go as fantasized.

Although the phrases were spoken by different women at different times, they are actually the spectrum of dysfunction. Let’s take a look at the combined effect and (unspoken) reality: “I’m open to anything (as long as you keep me happy). (If you misbehave and hurt me) I’m all caved up.”

On one side of the spectrum is an individual with Sieves for boundaries; everything pours through. On the other side of that stormy rainbow is an individual with solid Stones for boundaries; nothing can penetrate their defenses.

One word explains the essence of their craziness: Immaturity.

Children are open to anything and everything, because they lack the perspective, which comes from the knowledge, wisdom, and understanding, of education and experience. Those same little kids get their feelings hurt when another person tells them, “No.” Then, they go on to react as either: Rage-ers, by throwing a tantrum; or, Stuff-ers, by pouting.

Mature individuals accept responsibility for their own learning, growing, and doing. Daily, they make a purposeful effort to work on the things within their control and to consciously forgive the rest. They fully understand the importance of the boundaries which define where they end and another person begins. In the simplest of terms, they are: Distinguished.

Definitions:

Characterized by excellence or distinction; eminent.
Dignified in conduct or appearance.
Noble or dignified in appearance or behavior.
Eminent; famous; celebrated.
Advanced in character, attainment or reputation.
Of great significance or value.

Synonyms:

Eminent, great, important, noted, famous, celebrated, well-known, prominent, esteemed, acclaimed, notable, renowned, prestigious, elevated, big-time, famed, conspicuous, illustrious, major league.

Let two distinguished individuals come together and the odds of a mutually rewarding, healthy, and growing relationship skyrocket. One word and two people is the secret to building dynamic relationships and taking our society to new heights of discovery!

www.kimfoard.com

Pet Dragons

Pet DragonsAs a young, swashbuckling, knight, I made a few mistakes when dealing with snarly, fire-breathing, dragons, and those who played with them.

Having had exposure to the beasts in my childhood, I developed the belief and world view that dragons were good for only one thing: extermination.

Upon seeing an individual threatened by the worthless creature, I would ride in on my trusty steed and, with sharp sword, stick the monster. Much more than a piercing, the effort was designed to tip him over and kill it—dead.

Upon having achieved success, rather than the hero’s welcome that I expected, immediately, I was treated as a villain. The reason: That was a Pet Dragon.

There’s another story about a young boy who is walking along the beach and throwing Starfish back into the ocean. When challenged about the effectiveness of his effort and whether it, really, made any difference, he just reached down and grabbed another Starfish. As it sailed upward, reached the top of the arc, and settled back into its home, the little boy said, “Sure made a difference for that one.”

Question: What’s the connection between the two stories of Dragons and Starfish?

Answer: People and Choices.

Consider that life is like a game of Scrabble. We are all given, relatively, equal opportunities in the pieces, with which we start. For example, having drawn these letters: A, R, S, T, some of us will see a clever reference to a pack animal with first name of Jack. Since no points come from that, we shift our focus to a choice of words with scores. My choice is: STAR.  Another person might, only, see: RATS.

In fact, much more than a Scrabble match, those two words might be demonstrative of our, individual, world views. While teased about my rose-colored glasses, it is true: I’m an eternal optimist, who is always looking up at the Stars. Others are comfortable in the sewers, with their Rats.

Question: Is it right for the swashbuckling knight and starfish savior to rescue those who play with fire, or are stranded away from home?

Answer: Depends on point of reference.

It is right for them to be wonderful conduits for the goodness from above to flow through them for the benefit of others. It is wrong for them to force that goodness on another person. In fact, in the realm of human relations, they are not anointed ones, or saviors. They are simply individuals doing the best they can with the game pieces they have drawn.

Best is synonymous with Grow.

Good, better, best.
Never let it rest.
Until our good is better,
And, our better is best.

Each of us has a fiduciary responsibility to others. It is not to change anyone; it is to empower them.

At the moment an individual, with singed hair and blackened face, peeks out of the dungeon to ask for help; or, a person lifts their eyes upwards to look for a better way; we have an opportunity to share knowledge, understanding, and wisdom with them. That is empowerment; it is the fuel for the engine of change.

Education and experience are the twin catalysts to enlightenment. As we share ours with those able and willing to receive what we offer; and, in turn open ourselves to receive goodness from others; world views expand. Where we once only saw STAR and RATS, now, we can discern TARS and ARTS.

TARS is important to fuel our automobiles and seal our roofs; ARTS is what this life is, all, about.

As we open our minds and souls to the expanse of the Universe, we begin to realize the unlimited potential in each of us, just waiting to be unleashed. Let’s take PET DRAGONS of this world and convert the letters into a much more powerful dynamic: NO DRAG ~ STEP.

While it is not our right, or responsibility, to Drag another person anywhere, we have the opportunity to make gifts of chosen, purposeful efforts, often done in the face of fear, to nurture our own growth and the growth of others. That, my friends, is a Step in the right direction!

www.kimfoard.com

ASK

ASK Ask, Seek, Knock

Courage is a three letter word — ASK.

In fact, the acronym comes with built-in promises.

Ask and it will be given to you; Seek and you will find; Knock and the door will be opened to you. For everyone who asks receives; those who seek find; and, to those who knock, the door will be opened.

Within the last week, I have been reminded of how powerful one, little, word can be. As a parent, words are inadequate to describe the appreciation for two young adults, who are boldly making the world a better place. More than words, these two young people are living the principles — and, that takes courage.

Two children with different approaches. Yet, they are using the same Universal tool to receive goodness into their lives, discover new paths of growth, and have doors of opportunity swing wide open. All because they show up each day and do their part, to ASK.

One has been enrolled in the School of Hard Knocks (pardon the pun) for the last two years. The education and experience ranges from building log homes, pouring concrete foundations, driving beet truck, guiding dudes on hunting trips into — and, back out of — the wilderness, creating barbwire works of art, managing a crew of rednecks, tending bar in a cowboy saloon, busting broncs and spurring hair off of bulls.

Upon deciding to begin work on his graduate degree in finance, he went to where new wealth is being extracted and asked to be part of the action. By the time he made it back home, a Company wanted to know more — about him. After one five minute interview and a week’s worth of passing tests, this young man is across the threshold into a new adventure.

His older sister, while more conventional in approach, is just as non-traditional in her own way. A high school math teacher once described this marvelous combination of logic and emotion, straight-line thinker, and creative genius, with this statement, “She does everything asked of her and some things just for herself.”

Directly out of high school, she marched into college. At the beginning of her junior year, she doubled down by starting a full-time job, and adding another facet to her degree program. Towards the end of four years, a few credits were standing between her and graduation. With a faculty open to negotiation, the delivery of a little extra work earned the equivalent of a five year degree in four.

For the last two years, the education has continued with a Master Certification in customer service — and, the experience has broadened to managing technicians into productive roles, for the benefit of all. Wanting to be closer, geographically, to a Special Someone, she is carefully considering a variety of new opportunities.

A dad’s response to their effort — to ASK — “Wow!”

www.kimfoard.com

Young Pilots

Pilots at the Controls

At The Controls

The hand of the young businessman reluctantly reached toward the mouse. After he swirled it a few times to synchronize his mind with the cursor, he looked at me for the flight coordinates. We were ready for a new adventure!

Yesterday, he was sitting behind my desk in my executive chair and I was standing beside him, to be his guide. Waiting for us was an unexplored frontier, which I wanted us to look at together. As the CFO of a family business for the last couple of years, he has done everything asked of him, plus some. Rather than more words of instruction, I wanted him to have the experience of sitting at Command Central.

Since we learn by doing and the fun is in the doing, the purpose of our mission was to have fun learning!

A conversation with a businesswoman, earlier this week, is also a facet of this Thought du Jour. Recently, she enjoyed the opportunity to experience an aerial tour of a project, on which she is working, as a passenger aboard a large corporate helicopter. Part of our conversation included a discussion of best practices for bringing the next generation into an existing, and very successful, business.

How can we expect young entrepreneurs to captain the large ships of industry, when they seldom have the opportunity to sit at the controls?! That helicopter pilot learned the basics by flying small machines and, eventually, worked his way up to mastering the big ones. Guaranteed, he did not learn artistry of his craft by someone telling him how it is done!

Classrooms are not the same as Boardrooms; Professors are not the same as seasoned Veterans; and, Talking about something is not the same as Doing.

Young pilots, in training, sit at the controls. Next to them, in the co-pilot seat, is the instructor. The primary job of this instructor is to engage in a wonderful combination of activites which will build student confidence and scare them silly. The instructor will: by their words, tell their students what they need to know; by their actions, show them how to do it. Then, the real education begins, as the student learns by doing.

Typically, as in everything, the first few attempts are ugly. Improvement is made by practice, until the student thinks they know it all. At that moment of pride, their instructor makes a new believer out of them; by introducing an element of surprise. In the world of business, that is commonly referred to as a Variable.

For instance, a “stall” in the air is similar to one in business. The first time it happens to a young pilot and the new entrepreneur, hearts stop and breathing ceases. Same reaction: “Now, What?!” Same response: “Nose down, throttle up, regain composure and let the universal laws of physics and finances be your friend.”

Speaking of which, another conversation this week yielded, yet, one more gem of wisdom related to the importance of “hands on” education and experience. As a young man, my friend worked as a horse wrangler on a large ranch, which operated primarily for the benefit of encouraging and empowering adolescents.

The young people who came as guests, all, had one thing in common: they suffered from the insecurities of never having accomplished anything on their own. For six weeks on the ranch, they had a project and a choice. The project: a horse; their very own horse. The choice: work to connect with the horse as a friend; or, endure the relationship with the horse as an enemy.

As parents, we think training wheels on bikes are helpful and cute. Believing, they are a facet of building confidence. Generally, they are a crutch. The real joy on faces, only, comes after we provide the freedom to fail. Oh, sure, there are the looks of pure terror as our young people wobble, and crash. Yet, there are no words for the exhilaration of finding that first balance, on their own, and the accomplishments, which follow!

Later, our teenage student drivers discover a similar feeling, in the course of earning a license. The foundational principles learned in the classroom are important; what is practiced behind the wheel with an instructor, even, more so.

As we transition from the stories above into the world of business and finance, these same principles have merit. For instance: Spending an allowance is different from Budgeting a net employee paycheck, or business profit. The first is analogous to training wheels given to us; the second is the reality of producing results with our own hands on the yoke, wheel, or mouse.

As my young student clicked the last window closed and leaned back in my chair, our conversation turned to his frustration with some of his peers, who fail to consider the effect of key universal financial principles. When I asked him how he learned them, his response was, “You taught me.”

What began as a routine training exercise ended with a glimpse of the heavens; my spirit soared.

Let us, always, encourage our young people to fly!

www.kimfoard.com

A Few Good Men

Hard Work AheadTriumph of Right

Win, lose, or draw, there is a powerful and lasting legacy from doing what is Right. No amount of words can capture the essence of that Universal Principle. All I can do is to suggest, “Try it; you’ll like it!”

Within this series: Part I asked nicely; Part II probed into the core issue; now, We take a look at the choices before us.

There is only one way to defeat darkness: subject it to Light.

In this year of 2010, let’s use a 2 x 10 plank of action: If It Is To Be, It Is Up To Me

~

Dear Commissioner:

The purpose of this correspondence is to ask for a response to my email of June 28, 2010, in regards to the Subject of Fairness. Since the underlying issue of our conversation is of paramount interest to the great State of Montana, the complete history of our exchange is available on my website.

Yesterday, the headline of an article from the Billings Gazette caught my eye:
Montana’s Unemployment Rate Up Again

This is the lead sentence for the article, “The state’s unemployment rate continues to climb into territory last seen in the 1980s.”

In the simplest of terms, the discussion between you and I can be summarized by an answer to this question: Is it the purpose of the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) to Educate and Grow individuals; or, to Punish and Thwart their right to work?

Apropos to this discussion is the wisdom inherent in these words by Edmund Burke:

All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.

Since a key component of happiness is rewarding work, unemployment is a scourge – on individual psyches and the moral fabric of our society.

Why, then, has the DLI chosen to target business owners, who provide opportunities for employment? Yes, a job for an Employee is one legitimate route to satisfying work. Another path is that of being an Independent Contractor. In fact, before people worked for companies, they worked independently to provide for their own needs. To be quite clear, unemployment is strictly defined as the lack of a job.

The older Lady in this saga, who provides opportunities to Montana Employees and Independent Contractors, approached me for help in her recent audit with DLI. She grew up on a dirt farm in North Dakota. There is something about the experience of a childhood with limited opportunity, because of little money, that can be the catalyst for real labor and industry.

This woman, a Montana entrepreneur, has chosen a life path of service to others – first as an Employee and then as an Employer. Her choices have provided opportunities for others to learn and grow. Literally, in more ways than one, her efforts have provided roofs over the heads of many families.

In my email to you of June 28th, I suggested an equitable resolution to the audit issue of Employee vs. Independent Contractor. Since there has been no response, I’ll further extend the boldness to suggest that the issue of Unemployment can be fixed by encouraging our Montana Citizens to focus on Work, rather than a Job.

If the State of Montana and DLI is serious about the unemployed, offer to waive the $125 fee (for at least a year) that is currently required to register as an Independent Contractor. The publicity for the State of Montana will be priceless. The opportunity for neighbor to help neighbor, by providing value to the marketplace, will be the greater reward.

In the interim, I, do, want answers to my questions. This is a Montana Employer, who is in need of understanding – from those who hold the fate of her business and the jobs of her employees, in their (your) hands.

Sincerely,

Kim

~

www.kimfoard.com