Do the Work

Do the Work

I’m always amused by those, who have done nothing — yet, they presume to know everything.

Evidently, the one thing which has escaped the cauldron of their arrogance and ignorance is an understanding about the Buckets of Knowledge.

Bucket 1 — Those things we know that we know.

Bucket 2 — Those things we know that we don’t know.

Bucket 3 — Those things we don’t know that we don’t know.

If we’re totally honest with ourselves, there’s a little bit of “ac-knowledge-ment” about what’s in Buckets 1 and 2. We’re clueless about that big Bucket 3.

Simply, “We don’t know what we don’t know.”

A closed mind is a dangerous thing to encounter. The dark, swampy, stewed mixture of arrogance and ignorance emits a stench from which to flee.

All we do begins with a thought.

Until we choose to believe that we have much to learn, actual learning is impossible.

After adopting new thoughts, we must embrace a new habit,

Say what we are going to Do and Do what we Say.

Since we learn by doing and the fun is in the doing, let’s have fun learning, together.

In fact, if our minds wander back to the regrets of the Past, or if they race ahead to the anxieties of the Future, we can calm them by focusing on the task “at hand” in this Present moment.

Yes — simply, by putting our hands into doing something, our minds engage in helping our hands be successful in this new adventure. Any “mistakes” are simply acknowledged as measurements on this Journey of Progress.

From the Sage of the Ages,

Whatever your hands find to do, do it with all of your strength.

From the One of the Word,

My Father is always working — and, so am I.

By doing the work, we learn. We are also humbled — to be honored — in more fully understanding how little we know.

At that moment, we join true Leaders in the chorus,

What you learn — after you’ve learned it all — counts most of all.

In other words, let’s forget about the Buckets of Knowledge and open our minds to learning, more — by doing the work.

www.kimfoardcpa.com

Plan To Do Good

Loyalty and Kindness

All we do begins with a thought.

The gift of thought raises the human condition above the animal kingdom.

Without the ability to think, we would react as all animals do — with instinct.

With the freedom to choose, we are able to be the Captain of our own destiny.

Although able to choose, the question remains,
“Will we?”

Able and Willing are two entirely different concepts. The first is an inherent gift. The second is, literally, a moment to moment decision. Often, the next step is taken with furrowed brow and gritted teeth. By sheer determination and courageous will, action follows thought.

In other words, the ability to think and talk must be followed by the willingness to blink and walk. Thought without action is simply a fleeting fantasy of imagination.

The bridge between thought and action is a plan, a blueprint, if you will. Great plans result in great results.

If you plan to do good, you will receive unfailing love and faithfulness.

A certain amount of brick-and-mortar is necessary for a comfortable life. Food, clothing, and shelter are the basics to survive. What is required if we want to thrive?

The surprising answer is not something we accumulate for our own comfort. Yet, we benefit the most by giving them to another: Loyalty and Kindness.

Never let loyalty and kindness leave you!
Tie them around your neck as a reminder.
Write them deep within your heart.

We must choose to believe in the merit of these two words and all they can produce. Constant in our thoughts, they are of value only when practiced. Knowing and Doing are as different as Able and Willing. Education and Experience are required to draft the next great plan of action.

If you search for good, you will find favor.

Mother Nature abhors a vacuum. The only way to displace the unpleasant is to fill the vessel with goodness. That requires a conscious thought, a plan of action, and a commitment to do.

Your kindness will reward you.

As the uncertainty of current events swirls around us in a torrent of conditions beyond our control, let’s focus on the jewels around our neck and the journals of our heart. Two words can be a constant reminder of our life’s purpose: Loyalty and Kindness.

Let’s plan to do good!

www.kimfoard.com

Doing The Impossible

Doing The ImpossibleTwo fellows stand side by side at the Train Station.

One has just arrived to board the train.

The other has been there for quite some time.

In fact, day after day, he reiterates this belief, “Well, here comes the train, but it probably can’t get stopped.” As the train gently stops and passengers board, his comment is, “Well, somehow it got stopped, but it probably won’t be able to start, again.” Then as the train throttles down the tracks into the distance, he watches it go with a declaration of, “Well, that’s the last we’ll ever see of that train.”

Securely attached to his bad beliefs, that fellow is left behind.

The first fellow watches the same train come into view with the belief, “This is an opportunity made possible by the teamwork of many.” With confidence, he steps aboard in eager anticipation, “Those who serve me are deserving of my deepest appreciation and respect.” As the journey begins, he focuses on his purpose, “What goes around comes around. I intend to offer my best to everyone.”

It Couldn’t Be Done

By Edgar Albert Guest

Somebody said that it couldn’t be done
But he with a chuckle replied
That “maybe it couldn’t,” but he would be one
Who wouldn’t say so till he’d tried.
So he buckled right in with the trace of a grin
On his face. If he worried he hid it.
He started to sing as he tackled the thing
That couldn’t be done, and he did it!

Somebody scoffed: “Oh, you’ll never do that;
At least no one ever has done it;”
But he took off his coat and he took off his hat
And the first thing we knew he’d begun it.
With a lift of his chin and a bit of a grin,
Without any doubting or quiddit,
He started to sing as he tackled the thing
That couldn’t be done, and he did it.

There are thousands to tell you it cannot be done,
There are thousands to prophesy failure,
There are thousands to point out to you one by one,
The dangers that wait to assail you.
But just buckle in with a bit of a grin,
Just take off your coat and go to it;
Just start in to sing as you tackle the thing
That “cannot be done,” and you’ll do it.

Two fellows are given the same opportunity.

One is tethered to a distorted perception of reality.

The other is destined to make a difference in the lives of many.

All we do begins with a thought and a bit of a grin.

www.kimfoard.com

King Ranch

King RanchThe question was a simple one: How does a guy get ahead?

It was expressed with emotion and a twinge of frustration.

His eyes and body language were communicating the same, legitimate, curiosity about life. I realized he was serious and I was at a loss for words.

Sitting in front of me was a young man of twenty-three, who had accomplished more in the last two years than many get done in a lifetime.

Far beyond the six-figure salary that society uses to measure success, this young man is responsible for the lives of two dozen men, many who are more than twice his age. He manages millions of dollars of trucks and equipment for the production of billions of dollars of revenue.

Even more important, than the money and resources for which he is held accountable, is the character at his core. And, I guess that’s where words fell short of providing the best answer possible. All I could say in the moment, “Just keep on doing what you’re doing. You’re doing it right.”

We both knew that wasn’t the best response either one of us ever heard and, in time, there was apt to be more to the story. Two weeks later, I had a few more thoughts to share. This is the Rest of the Story.

At age twenty-three, empires are enticing. Courageous young men are determined to build one. And, that’s a good thing for them and all in their sphere of influence. The secret that awaits our crusaders is that the process of building is much more fun than the empire, itself.

The young empire builder and I have common knowledge of individuals sitting in the middle of wealth they did not earn. In this newly tuned conversation, I asked that we mentally separate those men from their inheritances. Then, we examined the individual ability to produce: those who appear to have it made vs. those who actually get-‘er-done.

The list is pretty dang long of the things this young man of twenty-three can do. Because of his humility, he was reluctant to begin taking inventory of his attributes. I gently reminded him, “It’s not bragging, if you can do it.”

Then, we considered what the “Born on third-base ~ Thought they hit a home-run” types can do. That didn’t take long: very, short list.

For a couple years now, I’ve been on this kick: All We Do Begins With A Thought. So, with time to think about his excellent question, I knew a better answer was possible. In fact, the answer was in the question, “How does a guy get ahead?!”


There it was: “A Head”: a noggin which is constantly thinking about splendid dreams. Thoughts without character are as dangerous as ships without rudders. And, that my friends, is when it dawned on me, that as much as my first response was adequate, the best answer recognizes the power of mind and heart.

For as he thinks in his heart, so is he.

Guard your heart above all else,
for it determines the course of your life.

We are a combination of our heredity and environment. Undeniably, we slip into this world hard-wired a certain way and, then, parents bend our little twigs.

Communication is what the listener does. Stories provide food for thought.

As we were sitting in Red Robin, munching on our hamburgers and fries, I began a story about Volkswagens, Road-trips, and Ford Pickups that I had been rehearsing in my mind for two weeks.

My dad worked on ranches owned by others. He made $200, per month, cash wages, the equivalent of $2,000 in today’s dollars. Half a century ago, the tradition was for Moms to be homemakers. So, one household income provided funds for the daily necessities and a two-week trip in the fall to exotic destinations.

Well … for a kid who lived twelve miles from the nearest semblance of civilization the other fifty weeks of the year, places like Squaw Valley and Lake Tahoe, California, seemed like another world. From the prairies of Montana to the wonders of the Sierra Nevada, and beyond, miles of road stretched before us like ribbons around the best surprise.

The year was 1965 and my parents had just purchased a brand new VW Bug. Not the Super Beetle introduced in the mid-1970s, or the Daisy Mae sedan sporting a flower vase; this was the original bug: Pregnant Roller Skate in the vernacular. I was 10 and my little sister was 3.

Looking around Red Robin for a way to describe the cabin size of that classic automobile, my eyes measured the four-person booth at which we sat. Perfect; the size of the table top was approximately the same amount of space in that VW Bug for two little kids and luggage for a Family of four.

My dad had an eye for packing and a creative mind. By removing the backrest from the rear seat, he could stack suitcases and travel totes to create a wall of luggage and a replacement backrest for his passengers. Our little bottoms, somehow, fit on the eight inches of seat visible and available.

Off we went on our adventure. As an experienced truck driver, Dad knew to adjust his speed according to road conditions and the weight of his cargo. In September, the highways are absolutely perfect. Yet, we were heavy. I remember leaning over to peek between the front seats to see the speedometer needle stuck on 45.

With four on the floor (manual stick-shift transmission) and four in the rear (cylinders in the air-cooled engine) maybe that was top speed. I don’t know. What I do know is that it was an era before audio books and iPods. Lucky for us, though, we had the real deal and an iMom. She read books, lots of books, to us.

The first Interstate Highways were being constructed. They were wonderfully straight and smooth. Cars and trucks passed us as if we were standing still. On the narrow, two-lane, roads, we backed up traffic for miles. Two little kids, with noses pressed to side windows that didn’t open, witnessed many middle-finger salutes.

I closed my eyes and dreamed about fast cars.

Fast-forward to 1971 and we were living in the foreign country of East Texas. I was 16 and running a tractor and brush-cutter for a farmer. He let me use his newer model Ford pickup to haul diesel fuel out to the field for that little John Deere tractor. For some reason, I imagined him giving me that pickup.

I closed my eyes and dreamed about fast pickups.

Then, in the spring of 1972, Dad decided he missed the open country of the North. We were headed home to Montana, kind of. A job was available on a ranch near New Underwood, South Dakota. For the month that we lived there, I rode to school with the kids of the family who owned the ranch. They all drove newer model Ford pickups.

I closed my eyes and dreamed about a fancy Ford pickup of my own, someday.

For as he thinks in his heart, so is he.

Guard your heart above all else,
for it determines the course of your life.

From the dream of many years ago to the reality of what I drive, now, a 2011 Ford Lariat King Ranch pickup, I told the story for the merit of the journey, not the destination. The value of the Builder is much more important than any Empire.

Rocky Mountain High

As I looked into the eyes of my lunch partner, he seemed to understand the moral of the story: To get ahead, the mind and heart are our greatest resources. Of all the men I know, if push came to shove, the one I want watching my back is this young man with great questions.

He has dreams of a ranch, cows, and horses.

His grandfather and I came down from setting roof trusses on the day this young dreamer brightened our world. As a Leo, he is a King and I believe a Ranch will be his, someday.

www.kimfoard.com

Less is More

Less is MoreMuch more dangerous than failure is success.

With success comes loss.

There is a loss of striving to reach the goal.

After the empire is built, then what?

Last week, in the course of a three-hour conversation with an empire builder, he was most proud of one story.

It was not about the treasures of the empire; it was about the joy of doing. The story epitomizes the essence of this Universal Principle: the fun is in the doing.

As his eyes danced back to the memory of a time long ago, he spoke of a harvest. Earlier in the conversation he had briefly mentioned the juggling act of doing the seeding in and around the other duties of caring for his cows. His first love is the livestock; he farms to care for them.

He smiled as he reminisced about an accomplishment only a few can appreciate. As a member of his club, I enjoyed the verbal portrait he presented. It was one of a cowboy, a combine (without a cab and with a 14’ header), a small straight truck, 320 acres of 20 bushel wheat, and 11 days.

Just imagine hot August days, with hardly a breath of air, sitting in the open on a bouncing seat above the spinning reel of the header, as it sweeps the standing stalks into the cutting bar. The aprons catch the fallen individual stems with heads of grain and rolls them gently to the center of the combine.

This continuous river of wheat flows under the driver into the threshing cylinder at his back. More dust and more roar, as metal fingers pluck wheat kernels from heads of grain. A cowboy, a combine, and a cloud of dust creep back and forth through the field.

The field is 320 acres. That’s one mile long and half a mile wide. A mile is the equivalent of 5,280 feet. With the combine traveling at two miles per hour, two trips across the field can be made in one hour. Each swath measures 14’ across. Since the cowboy, the combine and a cloud of dust have 2,640 feet (one-half of a mile) to traverse, that’s about 200 trips back and forth across the field.

Two trips per hour, nine hours per day, for eleven days was the time required on a bouncing seat, in the heat of August, through a fog of chaff, for our cowboy to earn the right to tell his story. In addition to the time in the driver’s seat, effort was also required to grease, fuel, and repair the iron beast. That was done throughout the stops to unload each hopper of grain into the truck for transport to the bin.

Short story; long lesson: the fun is in the doing. Really?! Eleven days of slogging through the discomfort of heat, dust and itch. Fun?! Yes, because the accomplishment of a harvest is the “Ribbons and Bows” around the planning and preparation that transforms thought into action.

Actions accumulate into a manifestation of success: the treasures of an empire. The stuff will come and go; the legacy will last forever.

The legacy is, simply, to say little and do much. A little bit of verbiage can be powerful, by speaking only the truth. Actions speak so much louder than words.

By giving our best, each and every day, we honor those pioneers of long ago and encourage the beneficiaries of tomorrow, to discover their own path to destiny.

www.kimfoard.com

Count the Cost

Count the CostIn every decision we make, two resources are at risk: Time and Money.

One, or both, will either be consumed, or invested.

The management of each is within our control.

We choose whether to spend, or invest.

We either choose, or the world will choose for us.

In fact, even when we choose, the world is prepared to laugh at us. That’s OK if we have put forth the effort to become all of which we are capable. The laughter of others, then, is simply their opinion of our effort. Success is the peace of mind in knowing we did our best.

Our best is only possible with Planning, Preparation, Practice and Performance. In any endeavor, these components form a circle of learning and growth.

All We Do Begins With A Thought

These seven magic words (above) ending in a seven letter word (THOUGHT), with U in the center, are the Alpha and Omega of the Four P’s.

In the beginning, is a Thought; the bigger and bolder, the better. Because, that initial thought becomes a target, a Goal if you will, worthy of what we choose to Do. The Four P Horsemen of Planning, Preparation, Practice and Performance will carry our effort through to a result and the appropriate Celebration of accomplishment, at the end.

This is the natural progression of a single Thought:

1.) Goal
2.) Planning
3.) Preparation
4.) Practice
5.) Performance
6.) Celebration

All We Do Begins With A Thought

From the moment we have a Thought, all the way through the process of what we Do, there will be a Cost to every choice we make, guaranteed.

From the Good Book, comes this encouragement:

But, don’t begin until you count the cost. For who would begin construction of a building without first calculating the cost to see if there is enough money to finish it? Otherwise, you might complete only the foundation before running out of money, and then everyone would laugh at you. They would say, “There’s the person who started that building and couldn’t afford to finish it!”

In every decision we make, two resources are at risk: Time and Money.

Of the two, Time is the most precious. Those who consider themselves Idea People, with runaway thoughts, fail to recognize the Cost for their flavor of the moment. If they are thinking about This, it is impossible to think about That.

There’s a Price we pay for, absolutely, everything.

As the progression of activity moves forward through each stage, from Thought, to Planning, Preparation, Practice and Performance, there is either an actual monetary Price, or an opportunity Cost of forgone alternative options. Even, the occasion of joyful Celebration requires the resources of Time and Money for the opportunity to tie ribbons and bows around the accomplishment.

Guess what, though? With accomplishment, come even bigger dreams. They will arrive in the form of more and different thoughts about new opportunities, heretofore, unseen. The cycle of learning and growth repeats.

All We Do Begins With A Thought

Please, count the cost.

www.kimfoard.com

Laws of Motion

Laws of MotionWhen an idea is tested and verified, it becomes much more than the original thought.

It moves past the semantics of a suggestion to a full-fledged law.

Now, I know that Political Correctness has disdain for the notion of law.

Yet, we fully appreciate the law of gravity. It is a recognized force on our bodies 24/7 and provides the security for us to stick on this spinning orb of Earth.

Sir Isaac Newton is the fellow given credit for “discovering” the Law of Gravity and the three Laws of Motion. Since he was able to put words around these ideas, let’s give thought to why these principles affect our relationships.

Universal Gravitation

Gravity or gravitational forces are forces of attraction. Every object in the universe that has mass exerts a gravitational pull, or force, on every other mass. The size of the pull depends on the masses of the objects.

We attract the attention of others. Everyone within our sphere of influence is affected by our choices. The effectiveness of the pull depends on the size of our character.

First Law of Motion

The first law says that an object at rest tends to stay at rest, and an object in motion tends to stay in motion, with the same direction and speed. Motion (or lack of motion) cannot change without an acting force.

Habits are so easy to form and so, very, hard to break. Whether stuck in a rut, or constantly searching for the next adventure, people continue on a distinctive path.

Second Law of Motion

The second law says that the acceleration of an object produced by an applied force is directly related to the magnitude of the force, the same direction as the force, and inversely related to the mass of the object.

Less is more. Size of ego will have an inverse relationship on acceleration to growth and opportunity. Large egos seldom budge from their grandiosity.

Third Law of Motion

The third law says that for every action (force) there is an equal and opposite reaction (force). Forces are found in pairs.

The ebb and flow, the give and receive, the yin and yang, creates the harmony of the universe and enhances our interaction with another person.

The common denominator inherent within all of these laws is a Force. In every culture, religion, and belief system, there is an underlying premise of Right and Wrong. No formal reference to an authority is necessary to state the obvious.

Each person knows this to be true. Individually, deep down, in our heart, soul, and mind, we can feel the forces. One is light; the other is dark. One is love; the other is hate. One pulls us up; the other pushes us down.

The force, which we choose to act upon us, will determine our:

Pull ~ Effectiveness of our efforts on those in our sphere of influence.

Progress ~ Effectiveness of our dynamic actions, direction, and speed.

Prospect ~ Effectiveness of our responsiveness to new opportunities.

Performance ~ Effectiveness of our dance into the hearts, souls, and minds of those we love.

All of these ideas, theorems, and thoughts can be summarized into one statement of this Universal Principle, “What goes around comes around.”

www.kimfoard.com

Conversations

We all love to talk.

Yes; some more than others.

The expressions of our thoughts, opinions, and stories give definition to who we are.

More than that, by expression, we fully feel our existence and a desire to share that aliveness.

Acknowledging the value of every conversation, there are only two types:

Conversation without Price is a social exchange.

Conversation with Price is an introduction to dynamic results.

Every syllable, sentence, and paragraph of personal conversations is of benefit in acknowledging the value of two individuals: the Talker and the Listener. Since communication is what the listener does, the social exchange works best with feedback. The listener becomes the talker and returns a volley of thought.

All we do begins with a thought.

What is required to transform thoughts into actions?

Answer: Price.

There are only two elements of any contract: Mutual Assent and Consideration. In other words, there must be an Agreement about Price.

What’s the difference between Cost and Price?

We’ve all heard of “Opportunity Cost.” I propose that we take a look at the other side of the coin, which is “Actionable Price.”

It is true; we are encouraged to “count the cost” before we begin. Otherwise, we begin things without finishing them. We, then, become the objects of ridicule for the sidewalk superintendents.

It’s one thing to avoid failure. It’s quite another to pursue success.

Costs are the inputs, the disposables, and the everyday consumption of resources. For example: utility expenditures to keep our homes comfortable. Price is the investment in a long-term benefit, which is either tangible, or intangible. For example: the asset of our homes; or, our educations, experiences, and relationships.

We can suffer Costs by passively doing, absolutely, nothing. In fact, opportunities can come and go, inflicting a heavy cost on body and soul. Or, we can run around in circles, with our hair on fire, billowing black smoke, and incurring tremendous amounts of expense, with absolutely nothing to show for the effort.

On the other side of the coin is the Price we pay for every action. By choosing this, we forgo that (all of that, every other option). Over time, the Price of our choices represents the investment we have made in ourselves and what is important to us. It is the value representation of every brick in the structure of who we are.

Whether simple cabin, or splendid mansion, we are the result of every choice we, individually, have made.

All we do begins with a thought.

Now, when sharing our thoughts with others in conversation, remember:

Conversation without Price is a social exchange.

Conversation with Price is an introduction to dynamic results.

We can banter to our hearts content. To accomplish the desires of our hearts, we must always consider the Price and offer it for Acceptance.

Then, we can expect mutually beneficial dynamic results. The catalyst for committed and disciplined actions are the two elements of mutual assent and consideration; an Agreement about Price.

Let the conversations begin!

www.kimfoard.com

Simply Complex

Diamond 3-D BrillianceArtisans give new life to the old perspective by capturing the essence of a single focal point.

The complexity and chaos of the ordinary is simplified into an expression of the divine.

The masterpieces of great art forms are discernible by one simple test. They appear magnificent: at close-up and from far-away.

By broad stroke and precise finish, tangible raw material is transformed into a reflection of the intangible thought, conveyed from the artist to the beholder.

What once was crude and unrefined becomes beautiful and polished.

Such is the journey of a diamond.

Formed in the center of the earth at high-pressure, high-temperature conditions and forced to the surface by a volcanic eruption, an ordinary rock in appearance becomes a priceless treasure.

The name diamond is derived from the ancient Greek αδάμας (adámas), “proper”, “unalterable”, “unbreakable”, “untamed”, from ἀ- (a-), “un-” + δαμάω (damáō), “I overpower”, “I tame”.

Diamond is the hardest known natural material on the Mohs scale of mineral hardness. This has been known since antiquity and is the source of its name. Somewhat related to hardness is another mechanical property: toughness, which is a material’s ability to resist breakage from forceful impact.

Diamond is renowned as a material with superlative physical qualities, most of which originate from the strong covalent bonding between its atoms into an inflexible three-dimensional lattice, protecting it from contamination. Diamond has the highest hardness and thermal conductivity of any bulk material.

Diamond has remarkable optical characteristics. Combined with wide transparency, this results in the clear, colorless appearance of most natural diamonds. Diamond also has relatively high optical dispersion (ability to disperse light of different colors), which results in its characteristic luster.

At the beginning of this thirty year adventure as a CPA entrepreneur, I was sitting in a Continuing Education Seminar and the presenter asked us to do the following: Draw a Triangle at the top of a page; underneath that, draw a Square; underneath that, draw a Rectangle; underneath that, draw a Circle; and, finally, underneath that, draw a Wavy Line.

Then, he asked us to place a Checkmark next to the image which best reflected our personality.

After a brief pause, he continued. The wavy lines are the Free-spirits. The circles are the Friendlies. The rectangles are the Worker-bees. The squares are Upper-management. The triangles are …

In his words: There are a few of you leaning back in your chair, with your arms folded across your chest, thinking, “I could do that. In fact, I could do that better.” They are the innovators, leaders and visionaries.

I laughed, because he had just described my posture and read my mind. And, my Checkmark was pointing at the pinnacle of the Triangle.

Do we come hard-wired into this world? Or, is our twig bent, in the formative years, to produce the fruits of our efforts, today? I don’t know.

From the comments of Family and Friends, this is what I do know:

“Kim, you ask so many questions, I’m sure you’re going to grow up to be a Philadelphia lawyer!”

“Kim, your problem is not that you were born poor. Your problem is that you were born with ambition. Many are born poor and stay that way. You want something else.”

“It’s rare to get cowboy poetry from a CPA, so thanks again Kim for making our day. More importantly, congratulations to you for having an open mind, looking for a better way, and contributing to the dignity of our profession by doing the right thing for your customers.”

Average is not a way of thinking, or behaving, for me. I respect and honor the right of others to be a commodity. My frustration will be on display for those who think that I should accept Average as my standard. Never have; never will.

With the belief that each individual is a priceless gem, my choice of stone is the Diamond: proper, unalterable, unbreakable, untamed, hard, tough, inflexibly three-dimensional, thermally conducive, widely transparent, optically dispersible, predictably exhibiting trigons of positive and negative relief.

This is the 100th Blog Post Anniversary Edition of SageTalk ~ Building Dynamic Relationships. What began as a forum for sharing thought has become a journal of adventure. Rough on the outside, rich on the inside; treasure awaits for those souls who will cut and polish the core of these messages.

We all have a unique perspective.

Mine is simply complex.

www.kimfoard.com

A Penny Doubled

A Penny DoubledIf you were offered 1 Million Dollars, today; or, 1 Penny, with the opportunity to double it for 31 days; which would you choose? We all do it; we go for the immediate gratification and forfeit 9 Million Dollars!

Granted, instant wealth is a secret fantasy of us, all. The next best dream entertained is to receive compound interest on a passive investment. Least favorite is to, actually and actively, earn our way to wealth.

Since the odds of winning a lottery are slim to none and interest rates are little better, let’s take a look at the return on smart thinking and hard work. Passive investments hope to earn a percentage on what already is. Active efforts yield bountiful harvests from the whole seed, planted for the benefit of future growth.

Real treasure has nothing to do with money and everything to do with the lessons learned on the journey of Life.

Speaking of which, a rich Fellow had business obligations in a far away country. Before leaving, He entrusted money to three of his servants in proportion to their abilities. Two of them went to work and earned double what they were given. The third one dug a hole and hid the gift.

Upon the rich fellow arriving home, the servants were asked, individually and separately, to give an account of how they had used the money. Two of them replied, “Master, you gave me wealth to invest and I have earned double the amount.”

Their master was full of praise and to each of them said, “Well done, my good and faithful servant.You have been faithful in handling this small amount; so, now, I will give you many more responsibilities. Let’s celebrate together!”

The third one recognized the Farmer Philosophy inherent in the principle of the matter; yet, did nothing to increase the principal of that within his sphere of influence. His response, “I was afraid I would lose your money, so I hid it in the earth. Look, here is your money back.”

No percentage. No harvest. No celebration.

After the judgmental and tepid tirade, the fearful one was quizzed by the benefactor, “Why didn’t you deposit my money in the bank? At least I could have gotten some interest on it.”

It’s not about the money. It is, all, about the lessons learned on this journey of Life.

You see, the rich fellow didn’t really care about the money, or the percentage of its increase. He was more interested in providing opportunities for growth. That only happens by smart thinking and hard work.

Then, he ordered, “Take the money from the lazy one and give it to the one who harvested the most. To those who use well what they are given, even more will be given; and, they will have an abundance. But, from those who do nothing, even what little they have will be taken away.”

All, we do, begins with a thought and the fun is in the doing!

www.kimfoard.com